Yellow Lab and seizure

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SpeedMaker's picture
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Yellow Lab and seizure

Last night I was sleeping and heard a bang in our room.  I woke up and found my lab stumbling around.  When I called her, she came over and threw up and continued to be unbalanced in her back end.  We took her out in the living room and she preceded to be somewhat tense and salivating a lot and her back end continued to be not functioning real well.  It lasted 2-3 minutes and then she was alright.  I am assuming that she had a seizure.  She turned 5 in February, but is a healthy dog otherwise.  This is the 1st time I have seen this happen to her and hope I never have to see it again.  Anyone else have this happen at all ever?  Is this something I should take her in for to have checked, etc.  Any info anyone has on this or anyone who has experienced this, I would love to hear what you did.

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Joined: Thursday, December 8, 2005 - 10:04am

My sisters dog used to have them quite often. She took him in and the vet gave her a med that they had to give the dog twice a day. In their case they took him in cause he had more than one, not sure what it was though.

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Joined: Wednesday, February 28, 2007 - 4:42pm

there are meds that they give for seizures but hang on to your wallet.

 

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My chocolate lab is on phenobarbital tiwce a day for the rest of his life.  Started Two years ago when he turned 4.  Sounds like the same type of seizures your describing. Not real expensive either, 100 pills for 10 dollars or something like that.

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would something like this possibly happen from heat stroke?  We were outside at night by a bonfire and I was throwing her ball for about an hour.  She came in and ate and drank a bunch of water.  about 45 minutes later is when this all took place?

"Skokie"

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A couple of years ago this happened to a buddy of mine's dog and they took him in and found out that he had a form of diabetes i believe.  The way you described everything is what we saw also.  He had a black lab and was probably around that 3-4 years of age.

campcook
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Joined: Tuesday, December 18, 2001 - 12:00am

My pointer/setter drop dog was hypoglycemic.  I needed to carry honey and biscuits to give her an energy shock throughout the day when temps were warm.  Having a dog convulse in the field is an unforgettable, helpless experience.  I was able to circumvent the possibilities with a good breakfast, plenty of water and honey. 

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We had a golden lab that did that a couple of times.
This was quite a few years ago so I don't remember
what the med was that the Vet gave us, but it did seem
to control the seizures.  It's my understanding this is
common for labs.  Our dog did live to be 14, so it must
not have been to bad.

566thMedCo/54thMedevacDet(Dust-Off)
"The louder you scream, the faster we come"

 
 

 

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I have a 7 yr old black lab that has had seizures like you desrcibed for the last 3-4 yrs.  Scared the heck out of us the first time it happened one night just like your dog. Vet put her on the phenobarbital but we took her off it after a while because it made her drink so much and pee all over the place.  Vet warned us that could happen.  She's not on anything and still has seizures every so often (month to 6 months apart) but the vet said we shouldn't worry unless she starts having multiple one in a short time or if she starts having ones that last more than 5 minutes.

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The Angry Minnow
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Joined: Thursday, December 13, 2007 - 2:50pm

ive seen this before and i would recommend taking her into the vet and tell them what occured.If it was a seizure the pills are not real expensive and will help her.None the  less id take her in.


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Joined: Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 9:42am

I have a chocolate lab that this would happen to2 or 3 times a year. Vet put her on a special diet and no problems so far. The "special" food isn't cheap though. They way my wife explained it, it has something to do with kidney function. Plus the dog is 10 years old.

Education will tell you a tomato is a fruit, while wisdom will tell you not to put it in a fruit salad.

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My 6 year old chocolate lab has been on phenobarbital for four years because of seizures.  He was diagnosed with epylepse and had seizure often.  The phenobarbital took care of it but it can be hard on their liver.  After having gone through this whole process of trying different meds to avoid the phenobarbital the vet told us to monitor the seizures and note how often they happen.  If it starts to happen often then take him to the vet.  Generally a vet will try and avoid putting your dog on phenobarbital.  The pills are not expensive but the yearly blood work to check out levels in the dogs system runs around $80.

I would not worry too much about one but say three in a month I would be going to the vet.

LONGBEARD LYNCH MOB

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My last golden had them,little more to the seizure tho,alot of trembing,tightness,foaming at the mouth,sometimes alot of gas~ Vet said seizures are common with most breeds however most folks are not with their animal 24/7 to see them,in my case I recorded seizures when they occured,spring and fall were the worst until the vet put him on 5mg of predizone 3 times a week,problem solved ,he was fine during winter and summer months.

I think your pup has another issue,I'd get to the vet for a check up.

Perazzi usa
Benelli usa
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got a 12 year old springer that had 3 of them from july to december of last year.  figured it was old age.  but, started thinking about the circumstances/events surrounding each siezure and the only common thread was.... get this.... milkbone treats.... we never used to have them at our house.  but, the wife's family feeds them to their dogs religiously.  we just so happened to have been w/ them at the time or just before the first 2 siezures occurred and she had been getting treats along w/ their dogs.  and i had just purchased a big box and given her 3 of the darn things the night of her 3rd siezure.  i switched her diet to diamond naturals dog food and threw the milkbones out.  its been 7-8 months now w/o a single siezure.  could be coincidence.  but, it can't hurt to review the last few days before your lab had her siezure and make sure she didn't eat anything out of the ordinary before you go fork over a few hundred to a vet.  good luck.  sure is a helpless feeling.  each time i was convinced i was "saying goodbye" to her.

Born to hunt and fish... Forced to work!

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Interesting observation Espringers!  Sure looks suspicious to me, though the only way to test your theory would be to put the pooch back on milkbones.  I doubty you'd want to try that!   The guard at Menards always give my dog milkbones when I'm going through the gate, but she won't eat them.  Maybe just as well.   
Wasn't there a bunch of dog food imported from China about a year ago  that was contaminated by some pretty nasty stuff?  

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The milkbone story reminded me of the first time my wife witnessed the dog having a seizure. She called me at work and had me rush home because she thought the dog was dieing. When I got home the dog was acting as some of you described. Drooling, hind legs not working, convulsing etc... Well, I didn't know what to do but try and comfort the dog. A few minutes later, the dog barfs up about 3-4lbs of red garnet field beans.  The landlord had been combining and storing on my farm in the quonset. I would have never thought a dog would have a taste of raw beans, but she is a glutton that will eat damn near anything. Anyway after the dog finished horking up the beans everything was back to normal. Now that I think about it, that may have been the first time she had a seizure. She hasn't had one since last January when the Doc put her on her "special diet". $50 for a 20lb bag. She hasn't lost any weight though. She still looks like a whiskey barrel on four legs.

Education will tell you a tomato is a fruit, while wisdom will tell you not to put it in a fruit salad.

wind knot
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Joined: Wednesday, June 12, 2002 - 12:00am

Lots of good information here. You can try the diet suggestions and see if they help prevent recurrence.

My two cents it is probably worth a vet visit or discussion by telephone if your vet does such things, especially considering the stated conditions that may have contributed to Speedmaker's  dog's first seizure.  It would likely take a vet's aid to help determine if blood sugar has anything to do with it.  Our male yellow lab is about 5 years now and has had seizures that we are aware of for about 2 years or so, ranging from just appearing uncoordinated to acting as if blind or vomiting (very rare) or defecating (rarely), and thrashing/flopping, never lasting more than a few minutes.  One link I observed is that usually when they (seizure) were observed, he had just been suddenly woke up from sleep.  They can be genetic or from head injury, so I am told.  Our dog did fall from a pick-up bed when not quite full grown (another reason not to let a dog ride in an open  pick-up bed no matter how much they seem to like it, I did have the dog on a homestyle 'bungee' set-up that I thought would prevent falling out but did not), dog was not knocked out or anything but could conceivably had a head injury at time, and the first noticed seizure was not for 1-2 years afterwards.  Dog has been on minimal phenobarbital daily dose for a year or so and has been generally seizure free that we know of.  His behavior has not changed, though I have heard of dogs requiring such a large dose/frequency they basically just lay there and do nothing, not a pretty sight either.  Some possible side effects of phenobarb have already been mentioned.

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like i said... my silly story could just be coincidence.  however, it turns out some folks seem to think diets can and do play a role in siezures w/ some dogs.  given the crap they put in some of the dog foods out there, i won't discount the possibility.  and tis probably better to just take her into the vet and make sure it isn't caused by something that can be easily diagnosed and treated.  good luck. 

Born to hunt and fish... Forced to work!

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espringers Said:

like i said... my silly story could just be coincidence.  however, it turns out some folks seem to think diets can and do play a role in siezures w/ some dogs.  given the crap they put in some of the dog foods out there, i won't discount the possibility.  and tis probably better to just take her into the vet and make sure it isn't caused by something that can be easily diagnosed and treated.  good luck. 

I don't think the diet idea is a silly one at all.  When the vet diagnosed my dog that is one of the first things we looked at.  I wish it would have been that easy.

Your dog could have possibly gotten into something that night that you don't know of.  Just one possibility.

LONGBEARD LYNCH MOB

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Joined: Saturday, December 1, 2007 - 8:41pm

 Figured I would bump this one up. My yellow lab is 7-1/2 months and he has had 2 seizures that we know of in the last 2 weeks. I am taking him in next Friday to be fixed and discuss what else to do. The vet was called after the first one and we were told to watch him and see if it starts occurring frequently.

jdinny
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 Have an 8yr old choc. He had his first about 2 years ago. Went dam near a year without one had 3 in 3 weeks. Took him in to pinkertons and blood work came back good. Told us to write down seizures and come back in a month to decide if we want to put him on meds....hasn't had one since. From the people I have spoken too there suite random

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Webs is it just the back end of you dog that it paralyzed. If it is it could be EIC it is getting to be a huge problem in labs

http://www.theretrievernews.com/Library/Articles/Veterinary/ExerciseIndu...

 

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7 dogs over the years and knock on wood never had to go through seizers, but buried 6 of them and 2 of them still make me tear up when thinking about them.

Hope it works out for you

There's a whole generation of Americans that have no idea about the truth of the Clintons, particularly Hillary 


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30 to 40 % of the lab population tested, have been carriers.
A carrier will never have a problem with EIC collapses.
The problem happens when two carriers are bred, this will produce and affected dog. You will here breeders say, I have never had any issues with EIC, so we do not need to test.
All breeding Labradors, should be tested for EIC, also
CNM, as well as several other health related issues.
Many, of the conditions, described, could very well be EIC.
The only way to rule it out, is a $60 dollar test, to the University of MN. Kaitie Minor, developed this test, about 6 years ago.
With this test being available, there is no reason, for there to be any, EIC affected dogs. It is the breeders responsibility, to make
sure all pups are not EIC affected.
May be worth looking into, there is no pill, that a dog can take,
to prevent these episodes, only reduced activity, and understanding, the things that trigger and episode.
Not trying to, stir the pot, just trying to help.

HOW COMMON IS IT?

EIC is the most common reason for exercise/excitement induced collapse in young, apparently healthy Labrador Retrievers.

EIC is common in Labrador Retrievers, and now that we have identified the mutation we can test for the condition. Current data shows that 30% to 40% of Labradors are carriers (with one copy of the mutation) and 3% to 13% of dogs are affected (with 2 copies) and susceptible to collapse. The percentage of affected dogs varies with the populations of dogs being tested, and the reason for testing. The prevalence does not seem to be very different between field trial/hunt test dogs, show dogs and pet dogs. Most (>80%) affected Labradors (E/E: 2 copies of the mutation) experience at least one episode of collapse by the time they are 4 years of age. A few genetically affected (E/E) dogs never exhibit collapse, perhaps because they do not engage in the required strenuous activity with extreme excitement as required to produce collapse. DNA testing is the only way to know for certain whether a dog has EIC.

The research laboratory has tested 100-400 samples from each of the common retriever breeds - they have tested Golden Retrievers, Flat-Coated Retrievers, Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers and Curly Coated Retrievers. They have also tested numerous dogs from many non-retriever breeds. So far, the mutation has only been found in Labrador Retrievers, Curly Coated Retrievers, Chesapeake Bay Retrievers, Boykin Spaniels, German Wire-haired Pointers, Old English Sheepdog, Cocker Spaniels and Pembroke Welsh Corgis.

DESCRIPTION OF COLLAPSE

Affected dogs can tolerate mild to moderate exercise, but 5 to 20 minutes of strenuous exercise with extreme excitement induces weakness and then collapse. Severely affected dogs may collapse whenever they are exercised to this extent - other dogs only exhibit collapse sporadically.

The first thing noted is usually a rocking or forced gait. The rear limbs then become weak and unable to support weight. Many affected dogs will continue to run while dragging their back legs. Some of the dogs appear to be incoordinated, especially in the rear limbs, with a wide-based, long, loose stride rather than the short, stiff strides typically associated with muscle weakness. In some dogs the rear limb collapse progresses to forelimb weakness and occasionally to a total inability to move. Muscles are relatively flaccid during collapse, although when restrained in lateral recumbency some dogs exhibit increased extensor tone in the forelimbs. Manipulation and palpation of the muscles, joints, and spine during or after an episode does not seem to cause discomfort.

Some dogs appear to have a loss of balance and may fall over, particularly as they recover from complete collapse. Most collapsed dogs are totally conscious and alert, still trying to run and retrieve during an episode but as many as 25% of affected dogs have had at least one episode where the owner reports that they appear stunned or disoriented during the episode.

It is common for the symptoms to worsen for 3 to 5 minutes even after exercise has been terminated. NOTE: A few affected dogs have died during exercise or while resting immediately after an episode of exercise-induced collapse, so an affected dog's exercise should ALWAYS be stopped at the first hint of incoordination or wobbliness.

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Fracman Said:
Webs is it just the back end of you dog that it paralyzed. If it is it could be EIC it is getting to be a huge problem in labs

http://www.theretrievernews.com/Library/Articles/Veterinary/ExerciseIndu...

It is a full body seizure. He loses controlled function in all four legs and shakes. Of course he keeps trying to get up. We lay him down with his head in one of our laps and just pet him and talk to him while it goes on. Pretty tough to go through the first few times for us. Just don't like seeing happen to our little guy. 

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Labs carry a gene for EIC, Exercise induced comma. It is recessive. Never by a pup out of parents which have not been tested and cleared for EIC and CNM. Back yard breeders will not have their dogs tested and you buy the pup because the price is right and....so and so says they are great hunters, promise!  Then pay every month for medications?? Buy a pup which has parents tested and cleared, end of this issue