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World War II Luger 1918

by , Posted to on 05/01/2011 12:14 PM | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 09/08/2007
Location: ND
I was asked to take pics of a friend's gun and do some research.  Unfortunately, I know very little about handguns.

Does anyone know where one can find more information on the potential appraised value?

Story is it was grabbed off a dead German.




"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not."  - Thomas Jefferson

62-45-3

Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/01/2011 12:47 PM | Reply #1 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 11/14/2006
Location: MT
Looks refinished.  I'd say $500 on the low end?  Just a guess.  Perfect examples can go for a quite a bit, $1000 plus.  If your buddy wants to sell for any reason PM me.
Yeah, it's kind of like that.
Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/01/2011 1:02 PM | Reply #2 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 05/23/2002
Location: ND
There are oodles of forums out there for collectors.  You really need to make note of all the stampings on the weapon because they all mean something.

The crown on the top should be an indication that it was one of the guns made by Mauser.  They manufactured the Lugers (P.08) from about 1930 to 1943.  The part about the symbol is something I'm not 100% sure about but the last part is correct.

I have a Walther P38 that I got from my Father who took it off a LIVE German officer in 1944 near Aachen just before they sent his unit to Malmedy just in time to get nearly run over by the SS.  I have researched the stamping on that pistol.  No way could anybody pay me what that pistol is worth to me but I know what the books say and it's not as much as you might think.
Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/01/2011 1:32 PM | Reply #3 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 09/12/2009
Location: ND
+ 1 on all the markings, stamps and numbers included they all mean something, can't tell if it has been refinished, numbers appear crisp, if it has been in your buds family for years,  I would guess not.
 
Pull off the grips and compare the protected bluing to the non protected, even if it was only carried and fired very little the bluing will show handling wear, on the back strap and front sight.

Some of these guns are factual others are pieced together, just like the stories that follow them. Good Luck.
Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/01/2011 1:44 PM | Reply #4 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 07/21/2003
Location: ND
www.gunbroker.com    will give you an idea on what its worth.

Y'all call me a paranoid gun-nut now, but we all know who you're going to be running to for help when the zombies show up.
Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/01/2011 4:46 PM | Reply #5 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 08/29/2009
Location: ND
Not to hijack the thread but Gunbroker.com wanted to charge me a dollar to visit thier site.  If they came to the door I would give them 2 but I wasn't about to  give out credit card info that easily.  I just ignored the emails and they quit asking.  Anyone else have this happen.

                                                                                                                         

Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/01/2011 5:08 PM | Reply #6 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 09/08/2007
Location: ND
I talked to my buddy who is nearly 80.
He has had the gun since 1968.
He got it from a neighbor who took it off a dead German officer during WWII. 
He smuggled it home (which was illegal at the time).
They are the only 2 to posses this gun in the last 65-70 years (since end of war).
He said back in the day he took it to a dealer and was told it is in A1 condition.
So no refinishing.

"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not."  - Thomas Jefferson

62-45-3

Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/01/2011 5:09 PM | Reply #7 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 07/21/2003
Location: ND
i go on there daily and have never had that happen.   good to know though
WormWiggler Said:
Not to hijack the thread but Gunbroker.com wanted to charge me a dollar to visit thier site.  If they came to the door I would give them 2 but I wasn't about to  give out credit card info that easily.  I just ignored the emails and they quit asking.  Anyone else have this happen.


Y'all call me a paranoid gun-nut now, but we all know who you're going to be running to for help when the zombies show up.
Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/01/2011 6:06 PM | Reply #8 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 05/23/2002
Location: ND
Tom Tom Said:
I talked to my buddy who is nearly 80.
He has had the gun since 1968.
He got it from a neighbor who took it off a dead German officer during WWII. 
He smuggled it home (which was illegal at the time).
They are the only 2 to posses this gun in the last 65-70 years (since end of war).
He said back in the day he took it to a dealer and was told it is in A1 condition.
So no refinishing.
I believe the story.  I am certain it was not illegal to bring it home.  My Father got a permit to send his home.  There was a lot of misinformation over there.  My father also had a MP40 Machine pistol that he carried around for about a month.  He was told that there was no way he would ever get that home so he sold it to a cook for a bottle of cognac.  He found out later that slipping $5 to the right guy would have gotten him a permit to ship that home too. (don't know if that would have involved anything illegal but it would be in my safe now).  He always said he regretted that trade.

Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/02/2011 09:44 AM | Reply #9 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 02/19/2003
Location: ND
Tom,

I recieved one in the 70's, and like an idiot I sold it to a collector in Fargo.  I can't remember his name off hand but all he collected was the German Luger and German Broomhandles.  He was a wealth of knowledge, if I can find his name I will forward it to you.

Mine was a 1917, but not as complete as yours, looks like you have the holster, cleaning kit, the whole works.  He had told me that mine was from an officer as well because it still had the original clip, he stated most higher ranking officers never fired them but wore them more for show thus the original clip was retained with the gun.  An officer in battle never worried about saving clips, if this is true or not who knows.  

Every part of that luger, if original,  will have the same manufactor serial # on it, right down to the firing pin, the holster and cleaning kit as well.  There are also many different models based on the branch of the millitary, the markings will tell you which, mine was an artillary model.   He took mine apart in about a minute, checked the parts for serial numbers, reassembled it and said it was all original.  Mine also had no real wear marks on it other than by the parabellum action. 

I sold mine in the mid 80's for $500.00 cash and a new Ruger Blackhawk 357.  To this day I still look at pictures of it and wish tha I had kept it!  Not sure today what it would be worth, depends on how many have surfaced in the past 30 years?

With the story behind yours I would never consider selling it!
Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/02/2011 10:41 AM | Reply #10 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 09/08/2007
Location: ND
Trapper62,

The clip matches.  So yeah, the guy never used it.

I called my wife's dad who is a HUGE WWII nut.  He and is dad collect guns and STUDY The war. He ran across the street to grab his dad's Luger book and started to ask me all kinds of questions.  I just couldn't answer them all.  But, everything matches on the gun.  The bullets are all authentic, etc.  It is a cool gun and I hope that I can narrow it down.  The stampings are really cool.  They each mean something.  He is mailing me the book to look at.

"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not."  - Thomas Jefferson

62-45-3

Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/02/2011 11:19 AM | Reply #11 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 02/19/2003
Location: ND
http://www.lugerforum.com/techinfo.html

Look at the downloadable Identification Sheets
Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/02/2011 1:30 PM | Reply #12 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 09/08/2007
Location: ND
Trapper62 Said:
http://www.lugerforum.com/techinfo.html

Look at the downloadable Identification Sheets
Awesome!  I will look into this.

"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not."  - Thomas Jefferson

62-45-3

Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/17/2011 10:18 PM | Reply #13 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 02/19/2003
Location: ND
Hope you have discovered a little information about your pistol.

The ERFURT designates a german manufactored Luger

The three symbols on the left of your last picture designate the following
German military receiver proof. Found on Erfurt Lugers produced 1908-1918.

The top symbol on the last picture designates - arsenal repair, refurbish, or modification

Can't seem to find the marking on the bottom left of the last picture, but again it is a deep stamp and hard to see.

In the pre-WWI period Lugers were produced by the German government arms factory in Erfurt as well as by Loewe's company, which was at that time named Deutsche Waffen und Munitionsfabriken (DWM). The DWM monogram or Erfurt Crown logo can be found on the toggle of the pistols they manufactured (usually... in the world of Luger markings there are always exceptions). The Luger was the standard German sidearm throughout World War I. Luger production continued sporadically during the post-war period, in part due to restrictions on German arms manufacture imposed by the Treaty of Versailles. The allies permitted official production to begin in 1925 at Simson and company. Simson, however, was owned by Jews, and the company was liquidated when the Nazis came into power. The Luger manufacturing machinery was purchased by Krieghoff. Mauser purchased DWM's Luger manufacturing machinery in 1929, and produced Lugers until the later part of World War II. The Luger was officially replaced for German military use in 1940 by the Walther P38 double-action 9mm Parabellum pistol, but certainly Lugers saw service throughout the war.

Have fun looking for answers to your find!
Re: World War II Luger 1918
by on 05/18/2011 09:09 AM | Reply #14 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 09/08/2007
Location: ND
Hey Trapper62,

Thank you for the feedback.  I really appreciate it.

I assume this is what the 2 symbols on the left look like:



Found here:

http://www.phoenixinvestmentarms.com/987erf18.htm


Let me know if that helps and what you think.

Tom

"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not."  - Thomas Jefferson

62-45-3

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Posted On: 05/01/2011 12:14 PM
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Tags: world, 0, war, luger, gun, unfortunately, story, research, information, asked
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