Tikka T3 Lite vs. Browning X-bolt

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fishnbucks's picture
fishnbucks
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Tikka T3 Lite vs. Browning X-bolt

Was looking at buying a new rifle and wondering what people have to say about these two rifles. Have narrowed down to these two. Hadn't looked at the x-bolt much until today and really liked it, but it's a newer model and it's made in Japan. I have a Tikka and really like it, but Beretta/Tikka customer service is horrible. Just wanted to hear what people that have fired these 2 rifles have to say. For the price one can't really beat a Tikka, but I like the appearance and some of the features of the Browning. It seems the Tikka has a lot more plastic parts than the Browning, which scares me a little bit.

hunt4life22
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Im curious correct me if wrong. Isnt the clip the only plastic part on the tikka?

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fishnbucks
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On the tikka, the trigger guard it plastic, the clip is, and there is a piece on the back end of the bolt that is plastic. That's about it I think. Haven't looked internally to see if there are any plastic parts.

 

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fishnbucks
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spelling correction... the trigger guard IS plastic, not it

 

hunt4life22
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I had a Tikka t3 lite in 25-06. I never had any problems in ANY weather conditions with function. Shot very good out of the box factory ammo, shot reloads superbly.I have no experience with Browning Xbolts. Another rifle hard to beat for the price is Howa even though I know its not one of the options.

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fishnbucks
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has anyone shot the x-bolt?

 

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Nanky
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I bought a Tikka T3 Lite 270 WSM last spring, and I love it. No problems at all and shot 3 deer with it this year.

07zx6r
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Joined: Wednesday, October 31, 2007 - 6:39pm

I shoot a browning 270wsm in the xbolt and I love it. I was debating between the tikka t3 and my browning. I went with my gun cause I knew more about it even tho it was more expensive. I love my gun and I will never buy anything but a browning bolt action agian.

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I didnt know they were in the same league. Wouldnt one compare the xbolt against tikka's wiser sibling?

Stay thirsty my friends

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07z6r, does your x-bolt shoot pretty well (good groups?). When did you buy it, just recently? Was there an x-bolt in years past, I guess I had never heard of it until I noticed it today and looked them up on Brownings site and it has a "new" icon next to them.
I probably should be comparing the x-bolt to a sako, but since sako makes tikka and the tikka shoots just as well as a sako, why pay $300-1000 more for a sako??? I looked at a sako but couldn't find enough difference when I compared it to the tikka to pay the extra money.

 

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In the price range of the X-bolt you might also consider a Model 70. The SS/Syn version hopefully will be out this spring. The wood/blued Featherweights are available now in 270, 30-06, and 300Win.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



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horsager, I looked at the model 70, I like the gun overall, but i really dislike the 3 position safety. Something that is really different and would really take some getting used to in my opinion. In regard to the model 70's, are they re-modeling them this year? Reason I ask is there sure aren't very many of them on the shelves.

 

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The Model 70 is all new this year, or at least it's being produced in a new facility, buy new employees, and to much higher standards. The available line will expand in '09.

The 3 pos saftey is one of my very favorite features though for me a saftey on a rifle is sort of moot as I for the most part don't hunt with a round in the chamber. I do understand though that saftey position for many folks is crucial and a change-up in that area certainly takes some getting used to.

What caliber are you considering? Have you looked at a Remington Mountain rifle or CDL SF? To just pick up a Remington off the shelf and go hunting unaltered, I like the fit/feel of the Mountain rifle over all other 700's, the short action SS/Laminate in particular.

I've not owned or shot the T-3 or the X-bolt, and I'm not trying to talk you out of either of them as much as making sure you've assessed all your options. Lots of folks look at the cheaper SPS Remingtons and miss or dismiss the rest of the Remington line.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



dooley
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I have a Tikka 338 mag in one of the earlier versions. This is the tack drivingist gun that I own. Factory Floated barrel, factory adjustable trigger, a smooth action and a Sako barrel, what more could you ask for from an off the shelf rifle? I would buy a Tikka over and over again as I am looking to do for my daughter right now.

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Horsager, I have looked at the Remingtons and in fact almost bought one a couple years back when the mountain rifle was available with a detatchable magazine. I really like that feature. I wish I would have bought the gun because now remington no longer offers it with a det. Mag. My brother shoots a rem 700 mountain rifle .280 and it's a great gun. I'm just not a big fan of the hinged floorplate. i believe the rem 700 sps still has the det. mag, but don't like the rifle overall. In regards to caliber, I'm pretty set on a .270 or .270 WSM. I'm not sure if I want to get the short mag or not. The wsm is supposed to be flatter and faster than a regular .270, but I'm not sure if it's worth the extra price in ammo. I want a flat shooting rifle that's pretty fast.

 

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This is why there are so many different models, everyone likes something a little different. You like the detachable magazine and something other than a 3 pos saftey, and when given the choice I prefer a blind magazine and a 3 pos saftey.

Fishnbucks, are you buying factory ammo or loading your own?

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



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fishnbucks,
I pondered the same issue early last fall. I wanted to buy a Browning x-bolt or an a-bolt, however ended up buying a Tikka T3. The rifle was more for my sons than myself, so I went with the lighter weight Tikka in a .243. I still like the Browning better, it fits me better than any other rifle and the features like the 30 degree bolt throw, the hand swell, very nicely balanced make it tops on my list. I just couldn't justify the extra cash for the limited use it would get.
The Tikka shoots VERY good right out of the box. You'll be glad with either.
Wayne

"Destiny is not a Matter of Chance, but a Matter of Choice'

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I picked up a Browning XBolt in 30/06 - more or less because I wanted to have a Browning.
The thing is an absolute tack driver.
Leupold rings/bases and a Burris Fullfield II 3x9x40.
She runs 50gr I4895 with a 150 Hornady flat base to roughly .4 MOA
I can shoot the accutip in the rifle as well.. not the worlds greatest group though.. only 1 MOA.

I'm the devil's son..... call me young gun.

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horsager, I'll be shooting factory ammo. I haven't tried the whole reloading thing and don't see myself doing it in the near future.

 

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It cuts your costs of doing business in half... why NOT do it?

I'm the devil's son..... call me young gun.

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For the price you would be hard pressed to beat a Tikka. They shoot well without any extra trigger work, bedding jobs, etc. I have 4 and would definitely buy another.

 

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Do you use the stock rings or pickup Leupolds/Weavers?

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fishnbucks

I have both guns, Tikka lite in a 25-06 and Browning x-bolt in 7 mm WSM, I would not be afriad of either gun, they both shooth about 1/2 inch groups with factory ammo, im sure if i was steady enough i could do better but that's close enough for me, The x-bolt feels a bit better to me but I have not had problems with either of them.


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All mine wear Talley lightweights. Factory rings are the only thing I DONT like about Tikkas.

 

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I own the Tikka in 22-250 and absolutely love the gun. Bolt action is very smooth and the trigger is nice and light for a factory trigger setting.

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thanks for all the replies. I have another question in regards to caliber. I said I'm leaning towards a .270Win or .270 WSM. Is it really worth it in the long run to go with a WSM. Plus, I've read on some articles how some calibers have come and gone, does anyone think the hype about short magnums will fade out and they will be tough to get ammo for? I want to purchase a gun that I will really like and will last a long time. If it's nearly impossible to get ammo for a .270WSM in 10 years, I don't really want to purchase it, I would then rather go with a regular .270.

 

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http://www.browning.com/products/catalog/firearms/detail.asp?value=023B&...

here is a link to browning's site and the calibers the x-bolt is available in.

http://www.tikka.fi/pdf/specs/LiteStainless.pdf

here is a pdf link to tikka's site and calibers the t3 is available in.

 

nxs
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Another vote for Tally lightweights.

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Caliber is a hot topic, everyone prefers what they have. What are you planning to shoot? If you want to hunt larger game than deer I would check out something closer to the 7mm or 30 range. If you intend to play around with varmints but still want deer capability, maybe a 243 or 25-06 would be better for you. If you just want a deer gun, 270 is hard to beat.

I have shot more deer and antelope with my 243 than any other gun I own. Not because it packs the most punch, or shoots the flattest. It is accurate and I am confident in its capabilities so I grab it more often.

 

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Talley light wieght one piece rings and bases are the way to go. I really like the set i got.

 Adn

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If you're not going to handload, the 270Win will be much more economical to shoot.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



Ice manRemoved
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I was actually thinking about building a range rig (300-800 yd) in a 270 WSM. Any reason not too?

WEFISH2
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I have a Tikka T3 it shoots good. The recoil lug is JUNK. The lug is two pieces. The one on the barrel/action. Then there is a piece that sets inside the lug on the barrel. I don't know how long they will last. If I had it to do over again I would not have got a Tikka T3.

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Iceman, the 7WSM would offer you more in the way of high BC bullets.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



nxs
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or a 6.5 of sorts...

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The 162 Hornady A-Max or the 180gn Berger VLD. Not much in the way of high BC bullets in .277. For hunting I largely ignore BC, for long range target work I pay lots more attention to the numbers.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



nxs
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....a 142 SMK or the likes of a 139 sucknar would do the trick in the 6.5

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I mostly hunt whitetails and an occasional antelope. However, in 5-10 years I might want to pursue elk or moose. Do you think the regular .270 win has enought knock-down power to take a moose or elk down, or would I be better off going with the .270WSM? I've looked at ballistics charts and the wsm does have more velocity and quite a bit more knock down power compared to the regular .270, plus it's flatter shooting.

 

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270Win and a TSX or a Partition will do anything you'd ever want it to in North America.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



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And, for all those who reload your own ammo, how hard is it to do? I've never reloaded ammo and none of my family re-loads. How long does it take, how expensive is it to get started, what would I all need to reload, how precise does one have to be and is it hard to be precise and repeat the precision? Is it really worth it to reload your own ammo? I suppose it is something a person could do during the winter when it's too windy and cold to ice fish or hunt yotes. just curious

 

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Anybody tried those hornady gmx bullets yet? What is the difference between barnes / nosler .

Stay thirsty my friends

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For roughly $400 you could be up and running with good reloading equipment that'd need no upgrades. It's no harder than following a rescipe in a cookbook. When you're just starting out figure you can load about 50rnds/hr and you'll get faster fairly quickly.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



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Has anyone seen a box of the new Hornady's on a shelf? I'll try them if they're significantly less expensive than TSX's.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



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i bought a t3 lite about a month ago replacin my ruger, cause of the adjustable trigger, i love the rifle i put some handloads togetther and am shootinn 5 shot groups less than the size of a dime.

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Horsager is right with the $400 price for getting started reloading.

While a kit is probably best for most people, I found that I didn't really like any pre-compiled kit. Either I didn't like the scale, the powder dispenser, something.

So I went the slightly more expensive route of buying things separately. Redding press (preferred the angled design over RCBS' straight), Redding powder dispenser, just had too many people tell me they had RCBS' powder dispenser issues. RCBS dies (one 25-06 set). Already had a high quality scale to check the powder dispenser.

Bullet pullers, calipers, loading blocks, lube pad, deburring tool, powder trickler, etc, etc. Then enough powder, cases, and TSX bullets to load an initial 100 rds ($100 worth).

Two things I don't have right now are a case trimmer and tumbler. A tumbler is about another $60 and a trimmer is anywhere from $10-100 depending on the style.

Get someone else to help you set it all up and offer some safety pointers. This is not a thing I would recommend making a simple mistake on that any experienced reloader could point out.

So if you find that you too don't like the kits (and you shouldn't if you don't want to have to settle for junk on some parts) you are probably looking at about $450 for the equipment alone.

I probably spent 6 hours assembling the equipment and then setting up and reloading the initial 97 rds (including setting seating depth of bullet). Hope it's a little speedier the next time around. :D

“Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or by imbeciles who really mean it.” ~ Mark Twain

hunterelk
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Reloading is the way to go. Sounds like horse and the rest of the guys use the expensive but deadly triple shock or the partion bullets and you can not buy these for cheap at the store. I shoot a 257 weatherby mag and a 300 weatherby mag. I use barnes bullets in each. If I were to go buy them in the store it would be 70 dollars per 20 shells. I can reload 100 shells for around 100 dollars. Look at auction sales or estate sales or in the paper for used reloading stuff. I picked up an RCBS rockchucker supreme with lots of extras for under 200 dollars then I bought all the dies from the store.

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Reloading is a good way to go. Evryone talks about the costs, but remember that you first have to get back (with cheaper shells) the initial cost of the equipment. You only save a fractio of the price of a box, so it takes along long time to get back $400.00 or more in equipmnt. Personally I don't think you have to shell out $400! 200 will do it nicely, cheaper if you buy used, even at a gun show. After all, it's impossible to wear out a press or a powder measure! I've been using my bottom of the line RCBS press for 40+ years and I saw one used just like it at the gun show the other day for $25.00! Saw a more modern fancier one for $50.00 too, which I was tempted to buy, but then thought about it and decided that the newer fancier one wouldn't load up any ammo better or faster than my older one. Same with a powder measure - you can't wear one out and a mechanical one bought used for $15.00 at any gun show is as accurate as a fancy electronic one, which I've never found necessary in 40+ years reloading.
To save $400.00 on shells you'd have to reload thousand of them. So forget about economy! When I started reloading it was true that you could reload much better shells than what was factory reloaded commercially. Maybe not so, anymore....
If you only shoot your guns a few times a year then its definitely not worth while to reload, from a money point of view, anyway.
Whats way more important than saving a few bucks (or not) is that you will develop a new hobby, and load and understand ballistics and be able to have a lot of fun working up various loads for all your guns. Reloading is an interesting thing to do that you'll find intriguing and challenging. But saving money is secondary, IMO!
What would be reloaders should do both to get your feet wet and save money would be for a few guys to go together and buy some equipment and everyone have at it. Then if you decide you will shoot enough or like it enough to justify buying equipment on your own, then buy a bunch of stuff at that time.

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If you're shooting premium ammo from any company for nearly any caliber it takes about 500-700 rounds to save enough money that your equipment paid for itself. After that, the equipment is basically free and for the most part, none of it ever wears out.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



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I haven't hunted deer or any big game for about 6 years. I actually sold my BAR 30-06 back then. Thought I was done deer hunting. I absolutely loved the BAR with a 2.5/8 Leupold scope. Wish I hadn't parted with it. Now, with all the speculation about the 2nd amendment and all that, I find myself desiring a rifle, plus, last season, I had surgery and couldn't hunt, and I missed it really badly for the first time in a long time. I've only ever hunted in MN for deer. On top of all this, I really want a black gun, if for no other reason than to annoy the anti's, and to assure that I have one before it all hits the fan. I have been reading this thread, and a couple of others very intently, as well as researching these rifles on the net. I went to Scheels and handled the T3 composite/stainless, the X-Bolt composite/stainless, and the Winchester 70 wood/blued (no composite/stainless available yet.) The X-Bolt has silky smooth action, and seemed either better balanced or just a bit lighter than the Tikka (perception?) but is a couple hundred more than the Tikka, and it's naked. No taps, no sights, no nothing. It's been a long time since I've shopped rifles, so I was surprised by the nudity of the rifle. I am by no means an expert in firearms, indeed a bit of a novice. I have a couple of questions. I'm probably going to go with a 270, but have always been a 30-06 fan. ND hunting is a different beast than MN hunting, with much more potential for longer shots. Could one be reasonably accurate out to 400-500 yards with the 30-06 as one would be with a 270, given proper bullet grains, etc.? I do know how to shoot, and earned expert marksmanship in the army, but it's just not a passion, or serious hobby of mine to shoot recreationally a lot. And another quesion? I've always wanted a lever action rifle. Considering a BLR in 270 or 30-06. Why is a lever action inherently a bit less accurate than a bolt? These are novice types of questions, but I though some of you accomplished shooters could have some fun giving me the benefit of your experience, expertise, wisdom, logic, and opinions.

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Yes.

Too much forend contact, the lockup isn't as precise, Trigger isn't as good.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.