tent camping in November

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fish-head's picture
fish-head
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tent camping in November

My sons, (32&19) have talked me into camping in the grasslands this fall while we are hunting mule deer. I have camped in a tent in alot of different weather including snow, but I am wondering about food for a week. De-hydrated, canned, or fresh and/or a mix of the three. We could pack coolers with fresh food and it could either be frozen all week or no ice in two days. Just wondering what you guys do on a tent camp week hunt.

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Tim Sandstrom
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What kind of tents are you staying in?

When wall tenting (canvas) we pack normal foods from frozen hamburger, cans of beans, canned vegetables, eggs, etc.  Usually if weather is going to be cold it isn't a big issue with the food as we place most in color inside the tent and it stays just fine.  Outside, yeah, it will freeze.

On warm weather trips we bring coolers that are loaded with frozen jugs of water.  One cooler is designated for ice ONLY.  It is taped shut with duct tape or other tape so no air can get into the cooler.  Then we transfer an ice jug or two over to another cooler to keep things the temp they need to be at.  Just have to keep the sun off the cooler and they stay pretty good.

Now, if you plan on doing a more "rough" style of camping I would stick to MRE type meals.  You don't have to worry about anything other than having water.  And heck, the MREs aren't all that bad actually.

Other canned good work too.  Dehydrated as well.  Kind of depends on what the tents are, if you have room for extra coolers, if you want big camp dinner, want more relaxed type dinners, etc.  All I know is most often a guy takes WAY too much food and has to haul back food when the trip if over.  Do a menu and it will help cut down on un-needed supplies.


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
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I have an outfitters tent we use every prairee season.  If you are driving to where you are settting up the tent, then there is no sense in not eating good.  Keep away from the dehydrated crap.  It is expensive and tastless.  We usually eat the same menu. 
Breakfast - Pancakes, bacon, and eggs with coffee/juice
Lunch - Sanwiches, with granola bars for mid day snacks
Dinner - day 1- Spagetti with garlic bread
                day 2 - Red beans and rice with sausage cut up into it
                day 3 - Beef Stew with bread and butter
                day 4 - Chilli with crackers
                day 5 - Steak with buttered noodles

Check the weather.  If it is going to be really cold you won't have to worry about ice.  If it is going to be warm freeze several milk conainters of ice and then they last longer and you won't have to worry about the mess of melting water.  Also if it is going to be warm wrap your meat in seveal layers of aluminum foil.  It will keep the meat frozen a lot longer.  Let me know if you need any more help.  Bob

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fish-head
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Just bought a 12'X12' Alaknak wall tent at Cabelas, and ordered a cylinder stove online. Looking for 3 cots now, don't want to chance using air mattresses that time of year. Thanks guys for your input, it was like a mental block thinking about the options with the food.

"A true friend is one who overlooks your failures and tolerates your sucesses"

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Tim Sandstrom
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You are in comfort and I doubt you will be taking that size of a tent in with anything other than the pickup.  Make a menu.  Enjoy warm meals on the stove.

Cots.  I have a very good cot for you to look into.  Pretty spendy and a little slow on putting together but a huge space saver and very comfortable.  Tried it out a couple times and it is a very good cot.  Will get another if we ever camp with four to five people.

Here it is:  Cam-O-Cot (and they are on sale!)

Some other hints.  Get carpet.  I bought some thin padded tight berber carpet.  Cut it to fit the tent.  Nothing like enjoying the snap crackle pop of the stove and having comfy carpet after a hard day of hunting!  Just make sure you cut out a spot where the wood burning stove sits.

I also would get a camp toilet.  We farmerized a five gallon bucket by mounting a toilet seat on it.  Use heavy duty garbage bags and have a plastic coffee can to store the toilet paper.  Much better than squatting next to a tree!

Inside the tent.  Put everything in totes.  Totes are waterproof, keep mice away, can be stack-able, can be put outside with no problem, etc.  We packed all our gear in it including clothes.

Also get a paper towel dispencer you can hang from the tent wall.  I still just use twine and a stick from a fallen tree.

Have shelving if you can hang it on the wall.  There are some good shelves on Cabelas and other camping web pages.  I don't have one yet but I know I want one.  It's nice to have things off the table, off the camp kitchen (I also suggest a camp kitchen!) and out of the way.  Actually, this camp kitchen has cupboards.  I will have to upgrade I think!!!!

Um what else.  Oh, have a pee jug.  Nothing worse than waking up in the night and have to undo the tent wall, put boots on, etc to go outside and take a leak.  A gallon jug works just fine.  Of course, you will want a cap for it!

Headlamps are a must.  A remote control lantern style light is nice so you can pop it on.  Also, check into whether you can hang a propane lantern from the ceiling of your tent.  I still like having propane because it gives off good light and also acts as a source of heat.

I'm sure I'll think of more later but those are some suggestions for now.  I wish I was camping this year!!!!


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
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we always stored our stuff in a horse trailer.  Tim you would have loved this set up.  The guys I elk hunted with had a 30 foot horse trailer we kept all our stuff in year around it had all the cabelas cooking equipment i it.  The propane stove  and the griddle and the camp kitchen.  We did all our cooking and cleaning in the trailer do to bears mostly.  There was usually 10 or twelve of us that went.  We had a huge army tent for the mess hall and card playing on stormy days and then 4 wall tents that we slept in.  We put tarps over our tents to help the snow slide off.  We had a guy that was about 60 years old from louisiana that did all the cooking we all pitched in 100 bucks and he took care of the groceries and the booze.  The nose of the trailer had a door that opened to the bar.  We never left civilization without 40 cases of beer but we stayed for two weeks.  My wife always accused us of just partying but most years we would get at least 7 or 8 elk so she couldnt make the charges stick.  Sorry for such a long post but with cool weather and this thread it brought back good memories.

you gonna set steel or whistle dixie

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When we tent it, we have everything on ice in coolers. Our menu for the evening meal is ribeyes, t-bones, prime rib, chicken, chili, and burgers. Sandwiches or brats usually for the noon eats. Granola bars and toast for breakfast. Here is a picture of the inside of our tent.


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She sure aint the prettiest girl at the dance but she sure can dance.

UserFiles/24/249/24935/Tent.jpg

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You will like the Alaknak.  My hunting partner and I have used one in Montana for late-season elk hunts and have been very pleased with its performance.  It may not be as heavy-duty as a canvas wall tent, but it's much lighter and easier to maintain.  We used it in below zero weather with no issues.  I advise to purchase the floor liner and would strongly consider getting the vestibule as well.  If you're not in bear country, there's plenty of room to cook in there, plus room to store packs, coolers, take off dirty boots etc.  Cabela's also sells accessory hangers for the center pole of the tent.  They're worth their weight in gold!!  You can hang your lantern, wet clothes and a cajillion other things from them. 

I don't know what stove you purchased, but here's a link to an OUTSTANDING stove.  http://www.fourdog.com/   We did a lot of research on stoves, bought this one (made one at a time by a guy in Minnesota) and were glad we did.  We got the fourdog model, but you would be o.k. with the threedog model.  I highly recommend the water jacket as well.  Nothing like ready-made hot water on demand for washing up after a hard days hunt, for dish washing etc.

As for meals, I agree with the others - - plan a menu.  When we haven't done that we always overpacked.   One easy and time saving thing to do is make the majority of your meals ahead of time and freeze them in single serving freezer or vacuum pack bags.  When you come in at night, the bulk of your cooking is already done - - just toss the packs into boiling water and you're set.  Individual size portions work best because they thaw more evenly, are easier to serve - - just cut open and put on plate - - and easier to judge how much you need.  This works great with entrees and some side dishes.  Not only have you eleminated a lot of cooking time, but you will have little to no dishes to wash!  We've brought everything from creamed pheasant to favorite casseroles to yankee pot roast to meatballs to BBQ pork loin and ribs to - - well, you get the idea.  Meals we cook on the spot are usually simple to prepare but are one of the best parts of elk or deer camp.  We'll reserve a night for rib eyes on the grill, another for good old fashioned deer sausage, fried onions and potatoes and HOPEFULLY one for fresh tenderloin.  Damn, I'm getting hungry!  Lunches are sandwiches, trail mix etc.  Breakfasts are big if we get our animals - - quick stuff (oatmeal, scrambled egg packets, p-butter etc.) if we're out the door at at 4:30-5:00 a.m. to get into hunting country by daybreak. 

One of the things I'm going to try this year is carry a back-pack stove and pot in my day-pack.  These things weigh mere ounces and can boil a liter of water in 3 minutes.  I'm thinking that it will be nice treat out in the field to make a hot cup of coffee or tea during a break and also have a hot lunch of whatever I can dream up (Ramen noodles, dehyd. soups, etc) at lunch time.  I'm thinking that this might add nicely to the experience. 

Anyway, just some thoughts on being comfortable, efficient and enjoying the hunt.  ALWAYS have first-aid essentials, basic medicines and survival gear along.    GOOD LUCK! 

  

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On warm weather trips we bring coolers that are loaded with frozen jugs of water.  One cooler is designated for ice ONLY.  It is taped shut with duct tape or other tape so no air can get into the cooler.  Then we transfer an ice jug or two over to another cooler to keep things the temp they need to be at.  Just have to keep the sun off the cooler and they stay pretty good.
 

Hey Tim, 

Back when we hunted wildernesses we also used frozen milk jugs kept in a cooler. But we would also put dry ice in with the milk jug cooler. It would really keep them frozen until we needed them in  another cooler. We generally would stay a week to 12 days and needed the ice to keep our food and the meat from the kills cold.

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Hold-High,

I can't remember the dang stove we have but it looks a lot like the stove you linked to. Ours is pretty good (especially compared to our old crapper!).  Only complaint is the water tank gets to be a buggar sometimes because the temp changes from a roaring stove to a cold stove swells the tank and can make it a sucker to take the tank off sometimes.  Very minor beef, however and I'd also suggest the same stove to others.

Last year I'm not even sure we put the tank on.  Almost easier just to fire up the stove and boil water.  Usually, when we used it in the past we used the water for rinse and body wash water.

Now, for individual packaging of meals  Yeah, we've talked about it.  And yeah, sometimes a guy gets back to camp past dark and he is whooped tired.  So tired that all a guy could stare at was the sleeping bag!  Having access to quick lunches would be nice.  Regardless, like you said, the best part about hunting is deer camp itself.

Day packin'.  Yup, I bought a little stove and a nice pack set of pots.  I don't know if I will utilize it this year.  Time is running thin with everything that seems to be popping up.  I planned to use the little stove and essential pack gear to head out on an isolated bow hunt this year.  Still might get to do it but I haven't even done any trial runs, packed my pack, adjusted it, etc, etc.  Might have to write it off until next year.  As for out rifle hunting, yeah a guy needs to definitely take a break.  I end up just sippin' on water and granola bars but a hot cup of something would definitely be nice on day breaks!

kraftmatic,

Ironically, my dad's girlfriend bought a horse trailer.  It has living quarters in it and I believe is a three horse trailer.  He's going to insulate the living quarters and wire it up for better lighting, etc.  I could see that being a very good tool for quick hunts, etc.  And yeah, we only usually had a couple nights of sippin' on beverages.  Heck, really only one.  After that to darn tired and it doesn't take much to get tippy!  Plus, then you have to get out of the sleeping bag a few more times a night.  Gets cold when a guy gets lazy and doesn't stoke the stove!!!!

Can't wait for the WY trip!  Just wish I wasn't moving right now.  I can't enjoy much at the moment!

Back on subject.  Yes, a rain-fly or vestibule or whatever you want to call them is a must.  Keeps condensation off the tent, helps slide snow and obviously repels water.  Another BIG SUGGESTION.  Is to take the tent stakes that come with your tent and throw them in the garbage.  Go get some rebar and make 12 to 14 inch stakes.  There are different ways to do it but make a good surface for you to pound on and something for you to grab onto when you pull them from the ground.  Dad used flat washers and welded them to the rebar but some broke.  I think that would still work if the weld job was a little better .  Another way is to just tee them.  Bending them would work too to put a loop into them but then there isn't a great pounding surface.

I don't know what stakes come with a tent now a days but I have yet to find anything that works better than rebar.  It binds into the soil, you can get rough with it and it gives you assurance you won't have any wind problems or slack problems.

Wow, I get going on this camping stuff!  Sorry for the long post!


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
gonefshn's picture
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If you plan to use some of the pre-packaged dehydrated foods, go and buy a few of the different brands and their offerings to sample.  Some are really good.  Some really suck.  Try them now at home and find what you like best.  It'll make that week that much more enjoyable.

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One word can sum up your food needs......HORMEL.  Chili or stew, dorito chips, bread and margarine, and of course a beer to wash it down and put you to sleep.  Keeps the camp smelling like camp, and works well for staying regular.

I say to hell with that pot o' gold.

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We always have a night of chili!  Can't have camp without it!


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
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Seems like a lot of work, get a hotel and eat in a resturant. Looks like it will be cheaper than a lot of the stuff mentioned and pictured on here. Hardly looks like roughing it. A lot of work to set up and tear down.

IT IS BETTER TO ASK FOR FORGIVENESS THAN ASK FOR PERMISSION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Hormel chili, sounds like a disaster waiting to happen when climbing a butte. HAHAHA!

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It's not roughing it at all with the setup we have (or any of the others).  With exception of cold temps, wind and rain.  Snow is a blessing for the most part as long as it ain't too much.

Hotels are fine and dandy.  So are restaurant meals but one can't explain to another that doesn't "get" what camp is like.  Those of us that camp understand .

Not to mention, I wake up, take a leak and start glassing the countryside for that big muley.  And hey, in the Badlands (where I hunt anyway) the closest town with a hotel is more than an hour away.  That's two hours drive time each day.  Half tank of gas.  60 to 90 dollar hotel rooms.  30 to 50 dollar restaurant bills.  Add that up with a few years of hunting trips and the wall tent and everything is almost paid for.  Not to mention, wall tenting or camping in any form in the Badlands is much more hunter efficient than driving to and from a hotel each day and night.

Setup is fun. Tear down isn't.


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
Pat'sPlace
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We typically plan our meals so that the stuff that keeps the longest is the last meal...eg. sausage & spuds or steaks that were kept frozen. We'll have the walleye and shrimp ring n the first couple days, precook some chili and soup and then freeze it and warm them up after they start thawing or at the tail end of the trip. A fresh non-frozen pan of lasagna cooked the day before we leave and eaten the 1st or 2nd nite is a real treat...especially after getting back to camp in the dark we don't like to cook for an hour before we can eat. Save the meals that take a lot of prep/cooking time for several days into the hunt...then the guy that already filled a tag is elected the camp bitch for those meals...while the rest of us are still hunting he's getting the meal ready to go for when we arrive after dark (or mid morning). We also try to do the cooking over a fire or in one kettle to minimize dishes.

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Does anyone walk in with tents and really rough it?  I have been wanting to try that but can't find anyone who is willing to put on the miles.

bowhunter
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        would love to do a hike in 5 to 10 miles back in where there are no roads and hunt for a week I think good things would come from it

LUV2HNT   Williston N,D

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enslow,

This year I had full intention to walk in on a Friday and not return until Sunday.  I bought some supplies early this spring and started reading up on other things.  There actually have been some good threads on FBO dealing with backpack hunts, etc.  I have some of them saved in my favorites (subscribed to them).  Can dig them up if you'd like.

Maybe this year I will get a chance.  Have to see.  If I do, Dani would be my hunting partner but I don't know if she'd like sleeping under the stars or not.  I use to do it in Boy Scouts.  Piece of cake unless it rains!  Then again, take a good bivy or just a chunk of plastic and deal with it!  Ha!

Anyway, yeah, I will be doing it but probably won't happen this year due to commitments, trips already planned, etc.  We'll see if I can make it happen though!

Grasslands gets shut down like they are talking many of us will have to get the backpacks out because it won't make any sense to hike in and hike back out each day.  Minimal roads will not allow someone to do day walks anymore, at least efficiently.


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
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I got a question for kraftimatic - I guess I understand the theory of kicking the horses out and spending the night at the trailhead before you ride in.  But what do you guys do ride in and then ride out? 

Stay thirsty my friends

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Enslow Said:

Hormel chili, sounds like a disaster waiting to happen when climbing a butte. HAHAHA!

I see it as "lightening" your load.  I'm not kidding, that stuff does taste pretty damn good after a hard day.  Convenience is its best quality though.

I say to hell with that pot o' gold.

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bowhunter Said:
        would love to do a hike in 5 to 10 miles back in where there are no roads and hunt for a week I think good things would come from it

not many places like that.  If you walk 5 miles, you will be at the next road, if you walk 10 you'll have crossed several roads.

I say to hell with that pot o' gold.

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gg,
very true especially in North Dakota. I don't think there would ever really be a need to backpack into somewhere with a tent and everything.

A funny story about backpacking in:
My friend and I were out in the mountains of NW Wyoming hunting mule deer. We got to the end of a trail and looked at the map and it appeared if we took off to the North we could get miles from any roads. We loaded up the frame packs with our bags, tent, food, water and stove. We had to cross a river right at the pickup. There was a large tree that had fallen across so we were crossing there. We were straddling the log because it was a long fall down if we fell and we were a little unbalanced with our packs. When we were both in the middle of this huge log we looked to our left and there was a car driving across a bridge.
So we scooted back to the pickup and drove to where we were trying to get to. haha. And then there was a 2-track trail following the river pretty much right where we wanted to end up. so we drove as far as we could and set up camp.

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Tim Sandstrom Said:
.  Half tank of gas.  60 to 90 dollar hotel rooms.  30 to 50 dollar restaurant bills.  Add that up with a few years of hunting trips and the wall tent and everything is almost paid for. 

plus the $200-500 bar bill,  

Stay thirsty my friends

kzz1king
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What are the regs for camping in the grasslands? Can you just pull off the trail a bit and set up? It sure sounds like it would be fun.

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kzz1king Said:
What are the regs for camping in the grasslands? Can you just pull off the trail a bit and set up? It sure sounds like it would be fun.

yes you can- no permit needed.
I believe you can drive 300' off the road and set up camp

"A true friend is one who overlooks your failures and tolerates your sucesses"

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  Shorthairs we didnt take horses just gear in the trailer.  We were in a migration area the gros ventre near jackson. I sware to you if it snowed the elk would come down and follow the river to the feed grounds and they would be every where come within 200 yards of camp sometimes.  you could hunt your butt off for a week and not see an elk then it would start snowing and all the sudden there would be hundreds of them around.  Sometimes we filled sometimes we didnt get hardly any .depended on the snow.  One time we woke up to two feet of snow and elk everywhere we got 8 elk in one day and the next day they were gone to the refuge. Thats what the beer was for when you went without snow for a few days it came in handy.

you gonna set steel or whistle dixie

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once again i am babbleing I love this thread it reminds me of good times had.

you gonna set steel or whistle dixie

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bowhunter_24 Said:

gg,
very true especially in North Dakota. I don't think there would ever really be a need to backpack into somewhere with a tent and everything.

A funny story about backpacking in:
My friend and I were out in the mountains of NW Wyoming hunting mule deer. We got to the end of a trail and looked at the map and it appeared if we took off to the North we could get miles from any roads. We loaded up the frame packs with our bags, tent, food, water and stove. We had to cross a river right at the pickup. There was a large tree that had fallen across so we were crossing there. We were straddling the log because it was a long fall down if we fell and we were a little unbalanced with our packs. When we were both in the middle of this huge log we looked to our left and there was a car driving across a bridge.
So we scooted back to the pickup and drove to where we were trying to get to. haha. And then there was a 2-track trail following the river pretty much right where we wanted to end up. so we drove as far as we could and set up camp.

Ha ha, yeah that's funny right there!

On the road closures.  If they close down roads projected in areas I hunt, there will be some miles a guy can put on without worrying about a road being blasted with hunters.  An occasional oil truck or pumper, yeah but if the hunters follow the rules (and the bird watchers, horse back riders, campers, bike riders, etc) a person could go undisturbed.  There is an area where 15 to 30 square miles will be roadless.  I think it was around 30.  Would have to go check.

Anyway, yeah, I agree.  You won't necessarily have to backpack in and backpack out.  I'm not advocating that but what I hate is back tracking.  With the pack and sleeping bag you can just keep on trucking and then cover new country on the way back to the pickup the next day or two.  Of course, back tracking ain't so bad either.  But it's just out of principle.


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
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Kraft - I verstehe now.  Makes sense and sounds like a good time. 

Stay thirsty my friends

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My new map shows the new roadless areas.  As far as I know the roads that are shown in the roadless areas....I know that sounds confusing....are still open to travel.  Actual signs I have seen do not indicate "no travel", rather travel restricted to existing roads and trails. 

Perhaps these few roadless areas were assigned to prevent new lease roads from being built.

I say to hell with that pot o' gold.

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New grasslands map?  I will call this morning.  I actually left a message with their office but never got a call back.  I hate that when that happens.  Although, I am guilty of it too...

gg, I was just sitting on the throne this morning.  You know, that is a very good tip, my dad is a lucky man in that every morning at X time he has the urge.  Having regular "urges" is nice out camping because you don't have to go into emergency mode...

I know folks, bad post but hey, it is camping / hunting related. 

krafty,

Are you saying you want to rekindle the good memories of elk camp?  I'm your huckleberry...


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
gdtrfb's picture
gdtrfb
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Joined: Tuesday, July 7, 2009 - 4:24pm

Do you need a permit to collect firewood in the grasslands, or can you just go collect wherever/whenever you want?


ggenthusiast's picture
ggenthusiast
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Joined: Wednesday, September 11, 2002 - 12:00am

gdtrfb Said:
Do you need a permit to collect firewood in the grasslands, or can you just go collect wherever/whenever you want?

As far as I know you don't.  I believe they used to give permits to cut fire-killed cedars.  As long as you're not cutting down live cedar trees I don't think there is an issue.  Could you imagine hiking/biking the Mah-Da-Hey, and having to pack wood for your campfires?

I say to hell with that pot o' gold.

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Tim Sandstrom
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PERSONAL USE FIREWOOD PERMITS


Personal Use Firewood Permits are for personal use only, and firewood may not be re-sold. A Permit sells for $5.00 per cord with a minimum of two (2) cords for $10. Maximum permit is five (5) cords for $25.00. The permit allows you to cut firewood from dead, downed trees only. Only one permit per person may be purchased annually.

The entire Little Missouri National Grassland, except campgrounds and the Blue Buttes, are open to wood cutting from June 1 to Mar 31.

Permits may be purchased at the Medora and McKenzie District Offices.

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Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
ggenthusiast's picture
ggenthusiast
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Joined: Wednesday, September 11, 2002 - 12:00am

You'd need one hell of a campfire to burn up 2 cords.  I highly doubt you would get in trouble for collecting sticks, branches and such for a normal campfire.  Now, if you fire up your Stihl with a 30" bar, I would definately get a permit.

I say to hell with that pot o' gold.

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Tim Sandstrom
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Joined: Monday, July 14, 2003 - 12:00am

I agree.


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
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simmsjs
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Joined: Thursday, January 8, 2004 - 12:00am

I love camping, I do hate the tear down thing. I was just giving ya'll a bunch of crap.

IT IS BETTER TO ASK FOR FORGIVENESS THAN ASK FOR PERMISSION!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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solocam
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Joined: Friday, December 2, 2005 - 8:38pm

Man, it doesn't get any better than a cracklin fire and being so tired after a day of hunting that you just crawl in and zonk.  I am ready for a trip like that---Tim and Krafty, show me where to sign!!

"When we step into the outdoors, we have the privilege of standing in the presence of God through the power and majesty of His creation. That makes hunting more than a sport or a hobby. It's a calling to something greater. And that transforms the places that we stand into something more than a cropfield or a pasture or a mountain. It makes that place Hallowed Ground."

Hynek
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Joined: Monday, September 29, 2003 - 12:00am

Who do I contact to get good maps of the grasslands?  Is there a website or do I have to contact a district office?  I'm starting to spend enough time out there I need my own maps. 

ggenthusiast's picture
ggenthusiast
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250-4443

I say to hell with that pot o' gold.

Tim Sandstrom's picture
Tim Sandstrom
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Joined: Monday, July 14, 2003 - 12:00am

gg got you a number.

Here's a website for other info:

http://www.fs.fed.us/r1/dakotaprairie/contact/index.shtml

If you have a handheld GPS I would strongly suggest you check out NDTrax.  It is a map for the GPS.  Click on the banner below for more info.


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
fish-head's picture
fish-head
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Joined: Tuesday, August 21, 2007 - 9:46pm

www.fs.fed.us/r1/dakotaprairie/ is the website for the grasslands. Tim, you beat me!

"A true friend is one who overlooks your failures and tolerates your sucesses"

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Tim Sandstrom
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fish-head Said:
www.fs.fed.us/r1/dakotaprairie/ is the website for the grasslands. Tim, you beat me!

Too slow grasshoppa! 


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
Hynek
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Joined: Monday, September 29, 2003 - 12:00am

Thanks guys.

I checked out the link to NDTRAX and it looks neat.  Does the program let you zoom in for more detail?  Or does that depend on the type of GPS you have?  I'm not real familiar with handhelds.  But my dad won one a year or two back, a Garmin if I remember right.  He took it out the box when he got it and I don't think he's touched it since.  So I'm thinking I might just 'borrow' it from his this fall.  

Anyway, I'd like to have topo maps so I know what the land is like.  I've hunted in the grasslands about a half dozen times, but not enough to comfortable with where everything is in the areas we hunt.

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Tim Sandstrom
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Joined: Monday, July 14, 2003 - 12:00am

Basically any Garmin or Lowrance will work with the map.  Yes, you can zoom for more detail.  No there is not topo with it.

Personally, I don't know if I'd want topo with a handheld because it is such a small screen.  I don't know for sure since I have never had it.  What I do enjoy is having the handheld with NDTrax and the paper grassland map (which has the topo).  In addition, having private landowner information (plat books).  Combine them and you are set to hunt with no ifs, ands or buts to worry about.
 


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
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riverview
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Joined: Thursday, December 25, 2008 - 7:17pm

I have a 10x14 straight wall ted williams that blew into our yard from the neihbors 25 years ago. I have used it every sharptail season since and we used to use until december pheasant hunting. I cut a hole in the roof and installed a woodstove. works great with wood everything is allways dry.
My brother has the cabellas alaknak tent. the only problem he has with it is that it sweats bad. he has a wood stove in it and it helps but there is allways moisture present.

Tim Sandstrom's picture
Tim Sandstrom
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Joined: Monday, July 14, 2003 - 12:00am

Yeah, wall tents are probably the driest tent to camp with.  AND YES, wood stoves are the cat's meow.  I have never camped with a vented and piped propane heater but there's no secret that propane emits water and a lot of it.


 

 

Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 

 
markday
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Joined: Monday, April 1, 2013 - 1:44pm

 hey guys I'm looking for a little camping help while we're on the topic.  My family and I are going on a hiking trip for a week and we need a 4 person tent.  I'm not really sure what tent brands are the best so I was hoping for some suggestions.  I found this site http://www.squidoo.com/best-tents-3-person-camping-tent and I'm leaning towards the coleman sundome tent.  Just hoping for a little feedback or suggestions before I make the purchase.  Thanks.  

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