starting an moa table/chart

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kylepv
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Joined: Thursday, July 21, 2011 - 8:06pm
starting an moa table/chart

I have recently started shooting long range and may even soon join some competitions and wanted to make a table to tape on to my rifle as a reference. I have seen several different ways of doing it and i saw a couple where it would say things similar to 3+1, 2+3, as opposed to - 23, or -7.5 for elevation and windage adjustments. I have also notices spotters giving these numbers as well, and was wonderind if anyone could tell me what this means, and why the military also uses this as an moa adjustment.

Thanks in advance

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Jiffy
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Joined: Tuesday, January 8, 2002 - 12:00am

.....the military uses the force......

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Horsager
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kylepv Said:
I have recently started shooting long range and may even soon join some competitions and wanted to make a table to tape on to my rifle as a reference. I have seen several different ways of doing it and i saw a couple where it would say things similar to 3+1, 2+3, as opposed to - 23, or -7.5 for elevation and windage adjustments. I have also notices spotters giving these numbers as well, and was wonderind if anyone could tell me what this means, and why the military also uses this as an moa adjustment.

Thanks in advance

Go here and enter in necessary data:

http://www.jbmballistics.com/cgi-bin/jbmtraj_simp-5.1.cgi

Study the table it spits out and it'll all make sense.

Here's a shortcut that'll get you close enough:  

1MOA = 1" @ 100yds.
1MOA = 2" @ 200yds
1MOA = 3" @ 300yds

The pattern goes on thusly.  Give or take you'll be about 1200yds before you need to know that 1MOA is actually 1.04791" @ 100yds.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



kylepv
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Joined: Thursday, July 21, 2011 - 8:06pm

Thanks horsager,

And thank you Jiffy for replying, funny thing because on one of the other forums ( Leupold vx 4 cds rifle scope) you posted a picture with this kind of table,

which is what i've been trying to figure out!... and i cant anywhere find what 6+2, 7+1, etc... means. I have only used just standard moa drop and am curious to see if this is a more efficient way of organizing the data. so Jiffy could you please help explain this?

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Jiffy
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Joined: Tuesday, January 8, 2002 - 12:00am

....that isn't mine, I copied it off the internet.

I use the force whilest engaging target. 

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Horsager
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kylepv Said:

Thanks horsager,

And thank you Jiffy for replying, funny thing because on one of the other forums ( Leupold vx 4 cds rifle scope) you posted a picture with this kind of table,

which is what i've been trying to figure out!... and i cant anywhere find what 6+2, 7+1, etc... means. I have only used just standard moa drop and am curious to see if this is a more efficient way of organizing the data. so Jiffy could you please help explain this?

If each click of of your scope adjustment = 1/4" then 1MOA = 4 clicks.  You'll notice on the above chart that the 2nd number is never higher than 3, that's because a 4th click would equal the next MOA value.  The 1st number is how many MOA, the 2nd is how many clicks past that MOA value.

On the chart above to make a hit @ 400yds you'd add 4MOA of elevation.  @ 500yds you'd add 6.5MOA or 6MOA + 2 more clicks.  600yds requires 9MOA + 2 CLICKS.

If you don't understand it now, give up.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



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WormWiggler
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Joined: Saturday, August 29, 2009 - 10:45am

OK  I'll bite.  What are the other three columns?

                                                                                                                         

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Horsager
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Joined: Tuesday, August 12, 2003 - 12:00am

 I'll guess too since that's not my chart and none of mine look like that.

Column 1:  Range
Column 2:  MOA elevation correction required
Column 3:  Mil elevation correction required
Column 4:  MOA windage correction for 10MPH full-grade crosswind
Column 5:  Mil windage correction for 10MPH full-grade crosswind

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



kylepv
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Joined: Thursday, July 21, 2011 - 8:06pm

Thanks again Horsager,

Now that you explained it I feel really stupid. I kept thinking it would be complicated, I guess I was looking to hard when it was right there in front of me. I'll try this method and see how it works out and know at least it won't be driving me crazy everytime I here about it and as a bonus i'll actual be able to understand it.

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blipelt
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Joined: Sunday, January 2, 2011 - 10:57am

Don't feel bad, I don't know anyone who can differeniate .7 from .8 mills when shooting.  Stick with an easy moa only chart.  If you start competing you will know your course of fire.  So a chart won't be very critical.  I run the newest version of exbal on my home computer and Shooter from Bryan Litz(Berger bullets) on my smartphone(only reason I have one is to run this software).  You get some pretty great software in shooter for only $10.  I have my chart fastened to my range finder.  I don't use it much anymore because of the way shooter is setup.  I really like this software.  You have tables of range, wind, and look angle you can scroll through to change in a second.  About as fast as a chart except exact corrections for the environment.  Make sure to check your data in the field, sometimes you have to tweak your BC to get it to match exactly.

Brent

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Horsager
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blipelt Said:
Don't feel bad, I don't know anyone who can differeniate .7 from .8 mills when shooting.  

Jiffy can.  He can range with them too, scary good as confirmed via LRF.

This moment is a paradox, it's the oldest you've ever been as well as the youngest you'll ever be.



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