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Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.

by , Posted to on 12/27/2012 09:13 AM | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 05/24/2008
Location: ND

Virginia needs to rid itself of Rep. Jim Moran

http://www.weather.com/outdoors/agriculture/news/Food-Farm-Horse-Slaughter_2011-12-01

Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.

 
 
Cheri White Owl, founder of Horse Feathers Equine Rescue, is pictured with one of the 33 horses she is currently caring for in Guthrie, Okla. Slaughterhouses could be ready to kill horses within a month if the U.S. Department of Agriculture provides funding for meat inspectors. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

 
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TULSA, Okla. (AP) -- Horses could soon be butchered in the U.S. for human consumption after Congress quietly lifted a 5-year-old ban on funding horse meat inspections, and activists say slaughterhouses could be up and running in as little as a month.

Slaughter opponents pushed a measure cutting off funding for horse meat inspections through Congress in 2006 after other efforts to pass outright bans on horse slaughter failed in previous years. Congress lifted the ban in a spending bill President Barack Obama signed into law Nov. 18 to keep the government afloat until mid-December.

It did not, however, allocate any new money to pay for horse meat inspections, which opponents claim could cost taxpayers $3 million to $5 million a year. The U.S. Department of Agriculture would have to find the money in its existing budget, which is expected to see more cuts this year as Congress and the White House aim to trim federal spending.

The USDA issued a statement Tuesday saying there are no slaughterhouses in the U.S. that butcher horses for human consumption now, but if one were to open, it would conduct inspections to make sure federal laws were being followed. USDA spokesman Neil Gaffney declined to answer questions beyond what was in the statement.

The last U.S. slaughterhouse that butchered horses closed in 2007 in Illinois, and animal welfare activists warned of massive public outcry in any town where a slaughterhouse may open.

"If plants open up in Oklahoma or Nebraska, you'll see controversy, litigation, legislative action and basically a very inhospitable environment to operate," predicted Wayne Pacelle, president and chief executive of The Humane Society of the United States. "Local opposition will emerge and you'll have tremendous controversy over slaughtering Trigger and Mr. Ed."

But pro-slaughter activists say the ban had unintended consequences, including an increase in neglect and the abandonment of horses, and that they are scrambling to get a plant going -- possibly in Wyoming, North Dakota, Nebraska or Missouri. They estimate a slaughterhouse could open in 30 to 90 days with state approval and eventually as many as 200,000 horses a year could be slaughtered for human consumption. Most of the meat would be shipped to countries in Europe and Asia, including France and Japan.

Dave Duquette, president of the nonprofit, pro-slaughter group United Horsemen, said no state or site has been picked yet but he's lined up plenty of investors who have expressed interest in financing a processing plant. While the last three slaughterhouses in the U.S. were owned by foreign companies, he said a new plant would be American-owned.

"I have personally probably five to 10 investors that I could call right now if I had a plant ready to go," said Duquette, who lives in Hermiston, Ore. He added, "If one plant came open in two weeks, I'd have enough money to fund it. I've got people who will put up $100,000."

Sue Wallis, a Wyoming state lawmaker who's the group's vice president, said ranchers used to be able to sell horses that were too old or unfit for work to slaughterhouses but now they have to ship them to butchers in Canada and Mexico, where they fetch less than half the price.

The federal ban devastated "an entire sector of animal agriculture for purely sentimental and romantic notions," she said.

Although there are reports of Americans dining on horse meat a recently as the 1940s, the practice is virtually non-existent in this country, where the animals are treated as beloved pets and iconic symbols of the West.

Lawmakers in California and Illinois have banned the slaughter of horses for human consumption, and more than a dozen states tightly regulate the sale of horse meat.

Federal lawmakers' lifting of the ban on funding for horse meat inspections came about in part because of the recession, which struck just as slaughtering stopped. A federal report issued in June found that local animal welfare organizations reported a spike in investigations for horse neglect and abandonment since 2007. In Colorado, for example, data showed that investigations for horse neglect and abuse increased more than 60 percent -- from 975 in 2005 to almost 1,600 in 2009.

The report from the U.S. Government Accountability Office also determined that about 138,000 horses were transported to Canada and Mexico for slaughter in 2010, nearly the same number that were killed in the U.S. before the ban took effect in 2007. The U.S. has an estimated 9 million horses.

Cheri White Owl, founder of the nonprofit Horse Feathers Equine Rescue in Guthrie, Okla., said she's seen more horse neglect during the recession. Her group is caring for 33 horses now and can't accept more.

"A lot of the situation is due to the economy," she said, "People deciding to pay their mortgage or keep their horse."

But White Owl worries that if slaughterhouses open, owners will dump their unwanted animals there instead of looking for alternatives, such as animal sanctuaries.

Animal rights groups also argue that slaughtering is a messy, cruel process, and some say it would be kinder for owners to have their horses put to sleep by a veterinarian.

"Euthanasia has always been an option," Pacelle said. But "if you acquire a horse, you should be a responsible owner and provide lifetime care."

The fight over horse slaughtering has pitted lawmakers of the same party against each other.

Sen. Max Baucus, D-Mont., said the poor economy has resulted in "sad cases" of horse abandonment and neglect and lifting the ban will give Americans a shot at regaining lost jobs and making sure sick horses aren't abandoned or mistreated.

But U.S. Rep. Jim Moran, D-Va., is lobbying colleagues to permanently ban horse slaughter because he believes the process is inhumane.

"I am committed to doing everything in my power to prevent the resumption of horse slaughter and will force Congress to debate this important policy in an open, democratic manner at every opportunity," he said in a statement

Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 09:32 AM | Reply #1 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 02/09/2008
Location: ND
 
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 09:37 AM | Reply #2 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 02/03/2004
Location: ND
Its about time, letting horses die and rot instead of putting them to good use is one of the dumbest things that has happened in a long time. Id guess more horse meat will make its way into dog food than grocery stores, but at least it will be used now instead of wasted.
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 09:38 AM | Reply #3 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 07/14/2003
Location: ND
 I almost fell off the toilet seat as I read Baucus was okay with it. 




 
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Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 09:39 AM | Reply #4 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 05/26/2006
Location: ND
Haha. 
Teach a man to fish and he will still vote for the guy who gave him a fish.
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 09:49 AM | Reply #5 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 05/04/2007
Location: ND
Anybody ever tried it? Can't be too bad I wouldn't think?
Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch.
Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 09:57 AM | Reply #6 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 12/14/2010
Location: ND
Tim Sandstrom Said:
 I almost fell off the toilet seat as I read Baucus was okay with it. 


Haha - glad im not the only one who does most of my internet surfing on the crapper
 "I get what you're saying:  Like a sausage replica featuring a Polander holding a sacred illumination device." 
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 10:00 AM | Reply #7 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 07/12/2003
Location: ND
will it be cheaper then beef???
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 10:13 AM | Reply #8 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 02/18/2004
Location: ND
guywhofishes Said:
Anybody ever tried it? Can't be too bad I wouldn't think?
I am sure we have all eaten worse.

Seems that over seas they eat a lot of it, look how nice their teeth are.




” We purchase things we don’t need, with money we don’t have, to impress people we don’t even like.”



Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 10:15 AM | Reply #9 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 05/26/2006
Location: ND
I'm sure Karen Thunshelle is having a brain aneurysm over this.

Teach a man to fish and he will still vote for the guy who gave him a fish.
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 10:16 AM | Reply #10 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 12/16/2001
Location: ND
Max Baucus from Montana?  Heck, he's one of the middle of the road Dems. Not a cowboy, but pretty down to earth.    If we could clone him and get rid of Pelosi and
Feinstein......

Question, can horses still be slaughtered for dog food or is it just human consumption that the antis were aiming at?  I've eaten horsemeat and its not bad at all.  Tastes a bit like ???caribou?? maybe.   Not bad at all.....

Tim, aren't I pads wonderful!!
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 11:23 AM | Reply #11 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 04/22/2009
Location: MT
Its about time, I'm starving.

I dont go around guessing cup sizes either I just know a nice rack when I see one.

Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 11:54 AM | Reply #12 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 03/08/2010
Location: ND
Horse meat is quite tasty. I have only eaten the hamburger and summer sausage but working on getting a thick steak to try. Very lean and heart healthy.
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 12:23 PM | Reply #13 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 01/27/2009
Location: ND
" Quarterhorse" chili with "pinto" beans, "mustang" tomatoes," painted" bowls, and of course..a cold "draft" beer.  Makes you whinny!
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 12:23 PM | Reply #14 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 01/27/2009
Location: ND
" Quarterhorse" chili with "pinto" beans, "mustang" tomatoes," painted" bowls, and of course..a cold "draft" beer.  Makes you whinny!
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 12:42 PM | Reply #15 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 07/12/2003
Location: ND

Veronese Horse Meat Stew Recipe - Pastissada de Caval

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From ,

 

Cenegenics® Official Sitewww.cenegenics.comPersonalized Age Management
 

Yes, caval means horse, and this is indeed a traditional Veronese horse meat stew, made with Amarone wine and paprika to taste -- the former local, and the latter revealing Austro-Hungarian influences from the period when the Veneto was part of the Austrian empire.
If the idea of eating horse bothers you, you can use beef instead -- it won't be quite as rich in iron, but will still be very good.

Prep Time: 35 minutes

Cook Time: 2 hours

Total Time: 2 hours, 35 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds (1 k) horsemeat, cut from the rump, or beef if you must
     
  • 2 sticks celery
     
  • 2-3 carrots
     
  • 1 large onion
     
  • 4 cloves
     
  • A dozen coriander seeds
     
  • 1 bay leaf
     
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 2 ounces (50 g) lard or porkback fat
     
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
     
  • 1 bottle full bodied, dry red wine - Purists call for Reiciotto Amarone or Valpolicella Superiore, but a less expensive red will work just as well
     
  • Salt & Pepper to taste
     
  • 1 tablespoon butter kneaded in flour
     
  • Flour
     
  • Paprika to taste (2-3 tablesoons, not too strong)

Preparation:

Lardoon the meat with the lard and slivers of carrots. Dice the other vegetables and put them with the meat and the spices except the paprika in a bowl; pour the wine over everything, cover and marinate in the refrigerator for three days, turning the meat occasionally.

Pat the meat dry (reserve the vegetables and the marinade), flour it, and brown it in the oil, in a pot over a brisk flame. Add the vegetables, and when they've cooked for a few minutes, pour the marinade over the meat. Reduce the heat to a simmer and cook for about three hours. Once the meat is done, remove it to a platter and blend the sauce.

Return the sauce to the fire, thicken it with the butter-flour ball, and season it to taste with paprika. Pour the sauce over the meat and serve, with polenta and the side dishes you prefer.

 
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 1:04 PM | Reply #16 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 03/12/2009
Location: nd
The facts regarding this are while Obama did sign a law into effect that ended the ban on the funding of inspections of the plants effectively shutting them down, There has been no appropriations of funding to restart the inspection process so that plants may begin processing and exportation as FDA inspected plants which in essence prevents them from operating.

So in reality there is no significant changes happening.
 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/roswell-meat-company-sues-feds-over-delay-in-opening-horse-slaughterhouse/2012/12/20/dbf20c6a-4ae6-11e2-8758-b64a2997a921_story.html

Here in the US while possibly not impossible to get, horse meat for human consumption has been virtually nonexistant.

The primary markets are overseas.



Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 1:29 PM | Reply #17 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 02/28/2007
Location: ND
gst Said:
The facts regarding this are while Obama did sign a law into effect that ended the ban on the funding of inspections of the plants effectively shutting them down, There has been no appropriations of funding to restart the inspection process so that plants may begin processing and exportation as FDA inspected plants which in essence prevents them from operating.

So in reality there is no significant changes happening.
 
http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/roswell-meat-company-sues-feds-over-delay-in-opening-horse-slaughterhouse/2012/12/20/dbf20c6a-4ae6-11e2-8758-b64a2997a921_story.html

Here in the US while possibly not impossible to get, horse meat for human consumption has been virtually nonexistant.

The primary markets are overseas.




I was going to post this very link.  Can't wait to see how this plays out.
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 2:05 PM | Reply #18 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 12/27/2012
Location: Ne
 FYI,

http://thoroughbredconfidential.com/2012/09/27/eating-raw-horsemeat/
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 5:41 PM | Reply #19 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 05/24/2008
Location: ND
Year after year more laws and regulations are passed in the name of protecting the food supply. That's a good thing. It costs big bucks to hire inspectors and meet all the rules and regulations.

Not just Congress but when the people demand more rules and regs they are then required to fund them. The slaughter plants would be required to operate under these rules and regs with no funding. That is an unfunded mandate.

If Congress cannot fund its rule making, then change the rules. If the meat is being exported to Europe then let them write the rules that they can live with. Hell, maybe they would even fund the inspections.

The story here is not whether horses are pets and all that non-sense. The story is that Congress made expensive rules and then at a later date pulled the funding.

If they can do it to one industry they can do it to another. That's BS 
Re: Horse Slaughter for Food Approved In U.S.
by on 12/27/2012 5:53 PM | Reply #20 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 05/24/2008
Location: ND
nythoroughred Said:
 FYI,

http://thoroughbredconfidential.com/2012/09/27/eating-raw-horsemeat/
We have a new member joined today. The article you posted is about eating raw horse meat. Hardly a reason to swear off horsemeat totally.

nythoroughbred, are you an activist?

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Posted On: 12/27/2012 09:13 AM
2054 Views, 39 Comments

Tags: horse, u.s, slaughter, approved, food, agriculture, owl, rep, moran, jim
More Tags: United States, Congress, Sue Wallis, Dave Duquette, USD, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Jim Moran, Oklahoma, Canada, Mexico, Wayne Pacelle, Nebraska, Virginia, Wyoming, Illinois, TULSA, Hermiston, Guthrie, The Humane Society, United Horsemen, Asia, Europe, France, Japan, U.S. slaughterhouse, pro-slaughter, White House, U.S. Government Accountability Office, Humane Society of the United States, Neil Gaffney, Barack Obama, Ed, Max Baucus, veterinarian, spokesman, President, vice president, president of the nonprofit, pro-slaughter group, president and chief executive, Missouri, North Dakota, Oregon, California, Colorado, Social Issues
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