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Barometric Pressure

by , Posted to on 01/23/2006 08:58 AM | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 12/06/2005
Location: ND
An old timer told me the only time he fishes is when the barometric pressure is rising. It was steady yesterday and I didn't do worth a darn. Any old wise tales that people go by. After yesterday I think I am going to start listening to the old guy. Is Devils Lake that tough after a front?
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/23/2006 09:21 AM | Reply #1 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 07/14/2003
Location: ND
SIRHC,

If you were to go and try to look up fishing articles on barometric pressure you'd have a tough time finding them.  The theory (which I believe in) goes unmentioned all the time...at least by the "experts".  I know in my expierences, which are limited compared to my mentors, I've noticed differences in fishing with switches in pressure...especially abrupt changes.  Stable weather (a few days of relatively flat pressure) has normally produced the best fishing for me with the pressure flirting in the 30's.  When pressure starts dropping to the low 29's I've noticed worst fishing..at least on the average.  Now, I've also had times when the pressure change has fired a bite but it usually is short lived.  The most recent was this spring when a thunderstorm fueld front started making it's way over the Nodak border.  Fishing was slow and then at about 12:00 pm fishing went fast and furious.  Soon, the 10 mph wind turned onto about 25 and a couple hours later the west turned darker and darker.  Fishing had already quit by that time but when I guy pays attention to those details he sees that sort of results.  Who knows, maybe it was coincidence but the mentors I have for fishing would qualify for the "old wise tales" you mentioned...because my mentors are getting old!  :-)

Tim S.




 
Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/23/2006 09:47 AM | Reply #2 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 12/17/2001
Location: ND
I noticed that too Tim. Stable barometer/weather brings fair to excellent fishing. An approaching front brings a savage walleye bite for about an hour or so before the wind hits. Why? I have no real clue as to the actual reason. There are just too many variables. All I do is listen to what the old timers say, and try it out for myself. 9 times out of 10 they are right on if you are following their directions closely. A fisherman has to really put himself in a prime location which is holding fish and wait for that front to close in. I sometimes wait too long, and get caught in the summer lightning and hail. Just random trolling will not produce a savage bite during an approaching storm. You have to be on an excellent fish holding location an wait for the stormfront. Otherwise, stable weather over a period of three or more days is what you need. Stizo :)


What we do in life echoes for eternity.   Shadows and dust.

Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/23/2006 10:10 AM | Reply #3 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 10/13/2005
Location: ND
Barometric pressure dose make a differance. Last year I won this little piece of equpitment called an Anglers Edge Plus. This thing charts Barometric Pressure, temtature, moon phase, sun rise and set. It take all of these to predict when the bite will be at its maximum. I am very impressed with this. Never would have believed it if i hadn't have tried it. I fish Musky tournaments very often and keep a log off all the fish I catch and see. When I check my log against my anglers edge, there almost identicle. Most of the Activity is when it predicted. They also have a similar product to predict big game movment.

Here is the Web Site. http://www.speedtech.com/asp/prodtype.asp?prodtype=48

Jon
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/23/2006 10:58 AM | Reply #4 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 04/28/2005
Location: ND
I have also noted a correlation between good fishing and the barometric pressure. My dad and I have been logging the barometric pressure for almost twenty years, and we have noticed that a steady barometer between 29.8 and 30.2 produces the best fishing. About fifteen years ago, we got the Hunting and Fishing Library volume on walleye fishing, which has a chapter on walleye fishing according to Clayton Folden. He states the same thing. A rapid drop (impending storm front) will also trigger a bite, but the fish shut off pretty soon after it drops out of the range noted above. You can catch fish when the pressure is out of the range above, but your best fishing is when the pressure is in range. And if you get three to five days of stable weather in the summer with stable pressure in the good range, five will get you ten that Dad and I are down at Van Hook, Shell Village, or Deepwater, because the fish will be on!
The other correlation that we have noted is the Good Fishing Times noted in the back of the In-Fisherman. Other folks have discounted solunar tables on here before, but we have also noted that the fish tend to bite the best during those peak times. The correlation isn't as strong as the barometer, but it is there.
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/23/2006 11:07 AM | Reply #5 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 12/02/2002
Location: ND
I think its more of a myth and that people lose confidence when they hear about fishing is tough after the front. A lot of times it just takes down sizing to something definetely smaller than what you were using before the front. 1/4 oz down to 1/16 oz. spoon/jig for example and working those lures very slowly as the fish just arent very aggressive. I guess this is what works on DL. Very early last week, we woke up to blizzard conditions after 35 and sunshine. The fish were still there, but getting aggressive with your jigging stroke would only spook the fish. They wanted a spoon only sitting there and thats the only way they would take it. Just my 2 cents.
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/23/2006 11:16 AM | Reply #6 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 07/14/2003
Location: ND
honkerhunter,

I understand what you are saying but at the same time you are making our point...fishing does in fact change.  I won't dispute that downsizing or running cranks vs. small jigs or small jigs vs. cranks or long lining lindy's vs. either is the way to go after fronts.  That's the after affect of a front.  Understanding the changes is the key.

Another guy to find books by is Dick Sternburg.  He fished a lot on the Arm with my uncles and Clayton during his writing years.  Good books, but even he mentions that pressure has little effect.

Tim S.




 
Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/23/2006 11:56 AM | Reply #7 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 04/28/2005
Location: ND
Tim,
The book I mentioned was written by Dick Sternberg, with Clayton Folden's input. A good book, and pretty informative.
Don't let me give anyone the impression the fish don't bite when the barometer is low, the moon phase is off, or it isn't the best fishing time. What I am saying is the peak fishing, when you can catch them on anything, is when these conditions are ideal. Anyone who follows tournaments knows that even under tough conditions, someone nearly always hits on a pattern that puts fish in the boat.
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/24/2006 2:26 PM | Reply #8 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 12/06/2005
Location: ND
Do you guys have a title for this book? I would love to read it. Thanks for the info, they are all great Ideas.
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/24/2006 2:36 PM | Reply #9 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 07/14/2003
Location: ND
drbob,

Interesting!  I didn't think too many people now a days new who Dick Sternberg was!  Kinda wierd to see locals from the area making print too!  And yes, good book for sure.  Pretty much the first generation of walleye books to go out (at least from my first steps).

SIRHC,

I have the collection at home.  I'll get you more information tonight.

Tim S.




 
Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/24/2006 2:42 PM | Reply #10 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 07/14/2003
Location: ND
SIRHC,

I did a quick Internet search on Sternberg:  Click here

Those are many of his books and I think the "Art of Freshwater Fishing" and "Walleye" are a couple that I have.  drbob, what was the title of your book?  Geez, talking about Sternberg brings back memories when I was a wee little tad and fishing Shell Village.  Sure wish I could have them days back.  Is this how I'll sound when I get older, and older, and older???  Sigh....as the world turns huh!

Tim Sandstrom




 
Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/24/2006 2:44 PM | Reply #11 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 12/06/2005
Location: ND
Sounds great. Thanks Tim. Drbob, I just checked the barometric pressure and it is 30.09. Now I want to leave work and go fishing. I think I am going to start measuring and charting this pressure to. Do you do mark it morning and evening or just anytime during the day? Thanks.
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/24/2006 10:20 PM | Reply #12 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 02/28/2002
Location: ND
I have a brother (yes, there are more than one of me - sad but true) who charts the barometric pressure religiously. He will only go fishing when the barometer is stable near 30 or when it is slowly but steadily rising. He claims that the slow steady rising barometer is even better than the stable. If the barometric conditions are not right, he stays home. I followed his chartings for a while and there is truth to it, but I have caught fish when all signs point to bad fishing and I have gotten skunked during perfect conditions before also. So when I thought about it, I decided not to look at the barometer EVER when it comes to fishing. I do not want to talk myself out a fishing trip because the conditions are not perfect. I go fishing when I have the opportunity and I could care less what any barometer has to say about it. That being said, there is truth to the theory and you don't even need a barometer. 3 or more days of stable, sunny weather without a hurricane wind and the fishing should be good. Those conditions usually also usually mean the barometer is stable.
.
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/25/2006 09:53 AM | Reply #13 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 04/28/2005
Location: ND
Sorry guys, I have been away from this thread for a while. The book that I have is "Walleye" in the Freshwater Fishing series, or something like that. I am at work now and don't have access to it. I will look it up tonight. I am sure that anyone wanting one (mine's not for sale) will have to prowl ebay for one, as I think that these books are now about 15-20 years old.

Tim, I am with you on the good old days. I have been fishing the Van Hook Arm for 27 seasons now. My dad and I started out in a 12' flat bottom jonboat, and about all we did was troll spinners and crankbaits. At first all we had were Wiggle Warts and Hot N Tots, and I can remember when the first Shad Raps came out, I think we paid six bucks each in 1984! But they sure caught fish. I fished for many years with a Zebco spincast combo, and the first depthfinder we had was a Sears Gamefisher model that had a suction cup mounted transducer. Now I fish with G. Loomis rods, I have enough tackle for about ten lifetimes, and everytime I read the latest walleye fishing article in In-Fisherman, I think that it cannot possibly get any more complicated. I have really started to try to simplify fishing as much as possible, because my day job is complex and stressful enough. My dad and I catch most of our fish on the "meat rig" that Clayton describes in his article. For those of you who don't have the book, it is a #4 or #2 Kahle hook on a 3-4 foot snell, behind a bottom bouncer, with a nightcrawler. I have changed to circle hooks, but the concept is the same. The rod is set in a holder, and most days the rod holder outfishes me. Humbling, but it puts walleyes in the boat.

Sportsman,
My dad is the same way. If the barometer isn't favorable, he doesn't want to go fishing. I am of the opinion that the worst day fishing is still superior to the best day at work, but he disagrees. He uses the low barometer days to get the "Honey-Do" lists done.

SIRHC,
We have a fisherman's barometer that Dad bought about twenty years ago from Cabela's. It is still available from them, it is in the section of the catalog with the new Color-C-Lector, etc. We look in the morning, and when we return in the evening, we check. You can carry it in the boat with you, but we never bother. Also, the Weather Channel also has the barometric pressure. Stay away from the local access barometric pressure readings, they have never been very accurate.

Anyway, sorry this is so long and rambling. Hope you guys get the chance to tighten a few lines this weekend, I am off to Upper Red Lake to try and catch a few slabs.
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/25/2006 10:25 AM | Reply #14 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 07/14/2003
Location: ND
drbob,

Enjoyed the post!  I had to chuckle when you said "everytime I read the latest walleye fishing article in In-Fisherman, I think that it cannot possibly get any more complicated."  If I may, I might just have to steal that concept for an article because it's so true!

As for chattin with sportsman, I agree...I'll go fishing no matter what the barometer is doing!

Tim Sandstrom




 
Kirsch's Outdoor Products | Fargo, ND | 701-261-9017 Garmin GPS Hunting Maps
Liebel's Guide Service | Williston, ND | 701-770-6746 liebelsguideservice.com
Jig-em-Up Guide Service | Grand Forks, ND | 701-739-9198 jig-em-up-guide-service.com

 
Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/25/2006 10:38 AM | Reply #15 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 12/17/2001
Location: ND
Drbob- I was wondering what brand, size, etc. circle hook you have been using. There are so many different ones out. I have used them and have about 4 different kinds but havent had much luck with them.

Re: Barometric Pressure
by on 01/25/2006 4:40 PM | Reply #16 | "Quote" | "Quick Reply" |

Joined: 04/28/2005
Location: ND
Tim,
Feel free to use my comment as the basis of an article. I enjoy In-Fisherman every month, but some of the articles just make me laugh. The best one is the electronic column in the Walleye In-Sider. I enjoyed reading about Bruce Sampson bringing his laptop with him in the boat with his custom Fugawi maps. My computer irritates me enough at work, if it acted up in my boat it would end up as structure.
By the way, the volume in the Hunting and Fishing Library series is "Secrets of the Fishing Pros". It also has an article about ice fishing for perch on DL with a gentleman by the name of Rod Sather. The copyright is 1989, and you know this because in the article, Mr. Sternberg notes that DL is big; "65,000 acres, to be exact" and "the maximum depth is 28 feet". Ah, the good old days. It will be a long time before those statements are true again. If anyone wants to find the book through interlibrary loan, the ISBN is 0-86573-029-6.

Shootsul,
I use Owner MUTU Light circle hooks, red, size 4. The key to using circle hooks is a limber, almost "noodle" action rod. The fish should be able to pull the rod tip almost in the water before it feels resistance. I fish the snelled circle hook behind a bottom bouncer, with the rod in a holder. When the tip begins jerking (this is the the walleye shaking its head; it is already hooked) just lift the rod and reel the fish in. No hookset necessary. The thing to do is just wait, there is no need to rush, the fish will be hooked in the corner of the mouth about 99% of the time. My dad doesn't like circle hooks as much because he enjoys a good hookset more than anyone else I know.
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Posted On: 01/23/2006 08:58 AM
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Tags: barometric, pressure, old, yesterday, time, timer, rising, didn, fishes, steady
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